Area Guides



Although technically still very much a village, Hersham has grown considerably in size since the 1900s – and particularly since the arrival of the main line railway in 1936.

Originally, Hersham began as a strip of woodland alongside the River Mole. It was occupied by pre-historic folk whose flint instruments have been found in large numbers beside the River on Southwood Manor Farm.

The Anglo-Saxons may well have been the first permanent settlers here and they gave the name to the place In the 12th century it was written Haverichesham suggesting Haeferick's hamlet or river bend settlement. By contraction the name become Haverisham, Haversham, Harsham or Hersham before finally settling only on the latter.

Hersham's first chapel of ease (Holy Trinity church, which was demolished in 1889 having been superseded) was built of yellow brick in Anglo-Norman style in 1839. Similarly congregationalists had a Round Chapel which existed from 1844 until 1961, the year in which the single dual carriageway in Hersham was created, and enabling its construction.

The original village formed around the Green in the late 1800s, and many of those original buildings exist today around Molesey Road, Queens Road and Pleasant Place.

The 1930s and 1950s saw further large scale house building – today the Hersham area has over 5,000 households – ranging from small flats to large detached houses on the Burwood Park estate and farms around the Burhill area. The 2011 census reveals that semi-detached houses are the most common housing stock.

Today, the village offers a Waitrose supermarket and a range of other shops and restaurants, as well as highly-regarded schools. The local authority is Embridge Borough Council, based in Esher.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT12 area:

Detached: £1,443,552

Semi-detached: £553,505

Terraced: £415,867

Bungalow: £660,767

Flat / Apartment: £289,016

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015.

Made up of four electoral wards and with a population of just over 24,000 at the time of the 2011 census, Walton-On-Thames has seen considerable growth in recent years, with the completion of ‘The Heart’ – a mixed development of shops, restaurants and flats – and the completion in 2013 of the new Walton Bridge, which cost £32.4m.

This bridge was the sixth crossing over the River Thames from Shepperton – before this there was a ferry, which dated back to at least the seventeenth century. Walton was listed in the Domesday Book of 1085 as ‘Waletona’ and lay in Anglo Saxon times lay in the ‘Elmbridge Hundred’ – today, it is administered by Elmbridge Borough Council.

Near to the bridge is Cowey Sale, recognised by the historian William Camden as the spot where Julius Caesar forded the River on his second invasion of Britain.

Also near the bridge is the location of Walton Marina. The towpath continues past The Swan pub towards Molesey to the Xcel Leisure Centre. The centre includes two swimming pools, an extensive gym, indoor courts and a climbing wall.

During the first World War, troops from New Zealand were hospitalised in the now-demolished Mount Felix House. They are remembered by a memorial in the cemetery, where those who died at Mount Felix are buried, and one in St Mary's Church where an annual service of remembrance is held. They are also remembered in the street-name New Zealand Avenue, the Wellington Pub (formerly The Kiwi), and a small memorial in the Homebase car park.

During World War II, owing largely to the proximity of important aircraft factories at nearby Brooklands the town was bombed on various occasions by the Luftwaffe. On 27 September 1940, fighter pilot F/Sgt. Charles Sydney, who was based with 92 Squadron at RAF Biggin Hill, died when his Spitfire crashed in Station Avenue. He was buried in Orpington and is commemorated today by a memorial plaque close to the crash site.

The railway came to Walton-On-Thames in 1938, with the original station named ‘Walton For Hersham’. The railway line divides Walton-On-Thames from Hersham and the station provides regular services to London Waterloo.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT12 area:

Detached: £1,443,552

Semi-detached: £553,505

Terraced: £415,867

Bungalow: £660,767

Flat/Apartment: £289,016

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015

Molesey is a surburban district comprising two large villages – East Molesey and West Molesey – situated on the southern bank of the River Thames and on the edge of Greater London.

The prefixes East and West did not appear until around the year 1200, before which there was only one parish centred around what is now known as East Molesey.

Prior to this, the area was recorded as Molesham in the Domesday Book and included 32 acres of meadow land.

Many of the grander houses in the area were built near the River in East Molesey, close to Hampton Court Bridge and Hampton Court Palace itself. This area includes roads such as Wolsey Road (named after Cardinal Wolsey), Palace Road, Arnison Road and the eastern end of Beauchamp Road.

The Moleseys share one long ‘high street’ – Walton Road, which runs from the borders of Esher through to Hersham, where it becomes Molesey Road. There are a number of shops and restaurants – but no station. Hampton Court is the nearest station to East Molesey – although the actual area of Hampton Court does not exist in terms of postal addresses!

The area around Bridge Street also has a number of shops, restaurants and pavement cafes.

One of the largest areas of housing in West Molesey is Hurst Park, built in the 1960’s, part of which was formerly the site of a horse racing course.

As with most of the area, the housing stock is varied, with just over 8,000 households recorded in the 2011 census.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT12 area:

Detached: £1,443,552

Semi-detached: £553,505

Terraced: £415,867

Bungalow: £660,767

Flat / Apartment: £289,016

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015.

Well known for Sandown Racecourse and Claremont Landscape Garden, Esher is located to the east of the River Mole and is has the offices of Elmbridge Borough Council on its High Street, as well as a good range of shops, restaurants, banks and an Odeon cinema.

When the station opened in 1838 it was originally called Ditton Marsh, but was soon changed to Esher And Hampton Court.

Prior to the arrival of the railway, the town grew slowly as a stagecoach stop on the London-Portsmouth road (part of which is now the A3).

Unusually – but perhaps not surprisingly – the majority of housing stock in Esher is detached houses (1,341), with 417 semi-detached homes, 332 terraced houses and 542 flats / apartments (source: 2011 census).

Also in the area, the village of West End sits between Esher and Hersham and has a pretty village green with two ponds. Also within the Esher postal code area, the villages of Claygate and Hinchley Wood have a number of local shops and restaurants, as well as their own rail stations.

The area has a number of well regarded schools – although Esher College is located in nearby Thames Ditton.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT10 area:

Detached: £1,736,705

Semi-detached: £746,159

Terraced: £700,334

Bungalow: £673,790

Flat / Apartment: £644,747

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015.

Addlestone is a large village which owing to its size is generally referred to as a town, 18.6 miles (29.9 km) southwest of London and 9.8 miles (15.8 km) north-by-northeast of the county town, Guildford; the town constitutes the administrative centre of the borough of Runnymede of which it is the largest settlement.

Narrow green buffers separate the towns of Weybridge and Chertsey and a larger green buffer including a farm, M25 and a golf course separates the village of Ottershaw. No fixed southern boundary with New Haw exists which has had signs at various points but not on all approaches.

The Crouch Oak, which is believed to date back to the 11th Century and is an important landmark of the town, used to mark the boundary of Windsor Great Park.

At the time of the 2001 census, there were just over 7,000 homes in Addlestone. The station, which is in the town centre, is on a branch line from Weybridge or Byleet and New Haw to Virginia Water and has services to London Waterloo.

The large village of New Haw has its own shopping parade and is home to the Basingstoke Canal, close to its junction with the Wey Navigation, and Byfleet And New Haw station, which is on the main Waterloo – Portsmouth line. The area really started to grow from the 1950s and the commuter boom, so there are few homes in the area older than this.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT15 area:

Detached: £677,863

Semi-detached: £399,307

Terraced: £326,517

Bungalow: £403,867

Flat / Apartment: £222,581

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015.

Now a fairly large town with over 6,500 households, Weybridge was once in the parish of Walton-On-Thames, but broke away in the 19th Century.

At the time of the Domesday Book it was described as Webrige and Webruge and was held partly by Chertsey Abbey. Indeed, until the late 18th Century Weybridge was a very small village with a river crossing. Seed milling to make flour and nurseries were the main uses of the land.

The town is largely surrounded by water, with The River Thames and River Wey (Wey Navigation) running through the area.

The neighbouring area of Oatlands has Royal connections: Oatlands Palace was built by Henry VIII and it was here that he married his fifth wife, Catherine Howard. When it was demolished in 1650, bricks from the building were used in the construction of the Wey Navigation canal. The Oatlands Park Hotel stands in part of the original grounds of the palace.

In 1838, a station was opened and development of the town really started. A developer, Walter George Tarrant, started building a number of large houses from 1911 on St Georges Hill – a 964 acre site which is now one of the most exclusive private estates in the country. Property prices are considerably higher than the national average and, in a 2008 survey, six of the ten most expensive streets in the South-East were in Weybridge. The station provides regular services to London Waterloo.

The history of Weybridge is linked to motor racing, with the construction of Brooklands race track having started in 1907. Brooklands was also an airfield and, by 1918, was Britain’s largest centre for aircraft manufacture.

In addition to the busy High Street, there are a number of shops, boutiques and restaurants in Queens Road. Housing stock is varied: the 2011 census shows the town having 2,090 detached houses, 1,142 semi-detached homes, 1,074 terraced houses and 2,519 flats/apartments.

Main source: Wikipedia

Average asking prices for KT13 area:

Detached: £2,386,393

Semi-detached: £850,728

Terraced: £681,648

Bungalow: £871,000

Flat/Apartment: £416,634

Source: Rightmove, Aug 2015.